a trip to Whiterock Conservancy

I took some time off recently to attend a family gathering in Iowa, where a few generations ago my family first homesteaded on the prairie. We decided to stop a couple places on the way to take advantage of having everyone in the car for a road trip.

Our first stop was at Starved Rock State Park, just off of Interstate 80. It has some interesting geology that is unique for northern Illinois. There is a nice system of trails, though with the heavy traffic the park receives, it was a little worse for wear. We somehow managed 3-4 miles in mud and stairs without any ticks, medical emergencies, or emotional breakdowns.

Can you spot the groundhog? He made quite a show of his rock climbing abilities for us

Highlights included a water snake, a giant millipede, and lots of beautiful streams and canyons.

The earth paints slowly, with liquid gravity.

The next day we stopped for a long break at Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge, which we hadn’t seen since we started a family. The refuge is thousands of acres of habitat located in the heart of corn country, and is one of the largest tallgrass prairie restorations on the continent. They have an active “friends group” (non-profit) that participates in programming and fund-raising, and their prairie learning center is top notch. Suffice it to say, I was a little excited!

An educational display on prairie restoration tools.
Plant plugs in a demonstration/learning greenhouse.
The incomparable roots of Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardii)

Neal Smith has 700 acres of it’s restoration fenced in for a few dozen bison and elk. Other than rounding them up annually for vaccinations, they leave them be. We didn’t get a close up, but we saw them on the hill.

We lodged that evening at an old farmhouse at Whiterock Conservancy, an organization I have been eyeing for a couple years.

Home, home on the range… a morning filled with the songs of grassland birds.

Whiterock Conservancy is a 5,500 acre non-profit land trust that balances sustainable agriculture, natural resource protection and public recreation on the landscape… Whiterock Conservancy was formed ten years ago to manage one of the largest land gifts in the history of Iowa generously given by the Garst family. Today it stewards 5,500 acres along the scenic Middle Raccoon River Valley near Coon Rapids, IA. The gorgeous Whiterock landscape that attracts visitors from all over the state, region and nation is a mix of savannas, rolling pastures, native and restored prairies, wetlands, riverside bluffs, fishing ponds, crop ground, and unique historic, geologic, and archaeological sites.

Trailhead signs to orient visitors.

I appreciated the simplicity and focus of their mission and the way they integrated the various aspects of the land community. Far from any metropolis or large natural area, it was a very unique place.

Educational signs for field days and tours.

The Prairie Strips project of Iowa State is research that I’ve been following for several years, and I was very pleased stumble upon this demonstration site. “The STRIPS project is composed of a team of scientists, educators, farmers, and extension specialists working on the prairie strips farmland conservation practice. Our research shows that prairie strips are an affordable option for farmers and farm landowners seeking to garner multiple benefits. By converting 10% of a crop field to diverse, native perennials farmers and farmland owners can reduce the amount of soil leaving their fields by 90% and the amount of nitrogen leaving their fields through surface runoff by up to 85%. Prairie strips also provide potential habitat for wildlife, including pollinators and other beneficial insects

Demo site. I saw several researchers in the field as I was sipping my coffee on the front porch.

This is where I’m supposed to write something snappy to sum it all up… but that’s enough commentary and photos. More later… Have a nice weekend!

3 Replies to “a trip to Whiterock Conservancy”

  1. Sr. Shirley

    Thanks for sharing the photos and story of your trip to Whiterock and Neal Smith. Sr. Mary talked about the root depth of prairie grasses but a visual certainly makes it real. WOW!! Looks like you had a great time.

    Reply
  2. Sr. Linda Volk

    You and your family didn’t just “get there” (to Iowa) but made the whole trip an experience in which every member of the family could learn something, enjoy much and make some new discoveries. Reminds me of our Sunday drives (in microcosm) when I was a kid and we drove the country roads to view the crops and farm animals for recreation. Not quite so exciting as your views 🙂 but gave me an appreciation for all things growing.

    Reply

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